Question Type 16 Method Sheet

Type 16 – Two words with opposite meaning. (Antonyms)

There are other question types that are similar to this question. Another question type asks you to select the MOST SIMILAR word; while yet another question type asks you to find a LINK or CONNECTION between words. You must make sure that you are focusing on answering the correct question type!!

In this question type you are asked to select two words, one from each group, that are most opposite to each other in meaning.

Look at this example and then we can work our way through the question until we get the answer: -

Select two words, one from each group, that are most opposite to each other in meaning.

( over   through   in )                   ( out   on   beside )

In total there are nine possible combinations of two words:-
(You should start with the first word in the left-hand set of brackets and match it against the first word in the right-hand set of brackets.)

over        -   out

over        -   on

over        -   beside

through  -   out

through  -   on

through  -   beside

in             -   out

in             -   on

in             -   beside

In this example, as a learning exercise, we have included some of the common errors, with explanations, that children may make when answering this question type.

over    -   out

These words are NOT opposite in meaning to each other but children may see the LINK  “over and out” – often heard on television when the actors are using radios to communicate. Children who are not focused on the question type may give this as their answer.

over    -   on  
over    -   beside

through   -   out
Some children will choose these words because they will be able to make a compound word using these two words and this is another type of question. Children who are not focused on the question type may give this as their answer.

through   -   on
through   -   beside

 

in  -   out
This is actually our answer because “in” and “out” are opposite in meaning.

in  -   on
in  -   beside

 

The ability to answer this question type correctly requires the child to have a very good vocabulary and this can be developed by reading a variety of books/magazines/journals etc. Children with a good vocabulary can quickly discount some of the nine options offered in the simple example above.

 

THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOR!!!!

Make sure that you are focused on the question type that is being tested.
Make sure that you are not making simple errors such as those outlined above in our example.
Avoid guessing the answer – though if you are completely stuck a guess is better than a blank answer space.
Teachers and children find this one of the more difficult verbal reasoning questions to answer and this is because it requires a good vocabulary to know and understand the words that are presented, and to be able to recognise when words are similar in meaning or opposite in meaning etc.
There is not really any “trick” or “technique” that can be taught for this question type as it relies very strongly on the child having a good vocabulary.

NB When you are completing a Verbal Reasoning test in Multiple-Choice format the correct answer will always be one of the choices that you are given on your answer sheet. If your answer does not match one of the answers that you are given then your answer is wrong.

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